Art supplies that I love!!

Hi there!!

I get so many questions about the art supplies and tools that I use and I do not always find time to answer all these question. Sorry for that. To make it up to you I made a overview of my favorite supplies. See below.
Please note, I use high quality (expensive) tools now, I didn’t start with those tools. I started carving in cheap lino and with the simplest carving tools I could find. I recommend not to start with expensive tools. Start simple and when you like carving and printing, spoil yourself from time to time with new supplies. Practice is more important than the most fancy tools 😉

I hope you understand I don’t know where you can buy the supplies in your country. The best you can do is to google ‘the product + your country’.
I made a link to all suppliers of the products, so you can have a look on their website and find more information and retailers.

Print ink:
For prints on paper I like to use the professional relief ink by @speedball_art . These inks are made from the highest quality pigments and contain no fillers. They roll out consistently and that results in crispy prints. The colors are rich and even it’s oil based it’s easy to wash off the block!
The same applies to @speedball_art fabric block printing ink! Big fan of this ink! Please heave a look at my little blog about fabric printing for more tips and tricks.
Click here for info and retailers of speedball art products.
A quality inkpad is a must have as well. Versacraft and stazon for example are perfect inkpads. Available in lots of different colors.


Pressing:
Probably the most important tool for a printmaker is his press. Luckily I’m married to the best pressmaker of the world 🙂
The baren and hand press I use are made by my husband Woodzilla! I’m  I use the wooden baren for small prints and test printing.
I’m the lucky (read spoiled) owner of two woodzilla presses. One A4 size press, for all small prints and  an A2 size press for really big prints. Woodzilla presses works perfectly with lino or rubber blocks on paper or fabric!
The presses makes your printing life so much easier…and they are available in different sizes! Even custom sizes and in every color you like. For more info, click here


Rollers: I use Speedball and Esdee rollers. For fabric block print ink I use a special speedball roller. These rollers are a bit softer and works very well with special fabric block print ink. Rollers are available in different sizes, for big blocks is a big roller a musthave. For small details can you use super small rollers.

Blocks:
I love to use mounted lino by Speedball art , especially on fabric. These blocks contains lino mounted on wood.  A handy way to keep your hands clean while printing.
I mostly use Speedy carve blocks by Speedball for my prints and stamps. It is soft and easy to cut and available in different sizes.
First attempt to carving? Take a big eraser. This is a cheap way to discover if you like carving!


Carving tools:
I love to use Flexcut carving tools.They are available in different sizes (even very small ones for tiny details). and separate or as set. For more info about the tools, click here
For cutting away the edges of the rubber stamps I use a sharp Excel blade. For more info, click here


Paper:
I’m really in love with speedball’s Arnhem 1618 paper. The texture is so pretty!! It is available in white, black, kraft and grey!
Speedball has more nice printing paper.

Fabric:
I use cotton and linen and buy them on a local market.

Some tricks:
A plate to roll the ink is necessary but you don’t need something fancy. A glass (from a photo frame) or rubber plate fits perfectly.
You can use transfer paper to get you image/ sketch on your block but baking paper or pattern tracing paper works out too.
An eraser is a nice rubber block for your first stamp.
Use simple plywood blocks and mount your stamps on it with contact glue.
Remember..every mistake is progress